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Home » Eye Care Services » Vision Therapy » Conditions Treated By Vision Therapy

Conditions Treated By Vision Therapy

  • Amblyopia or “lazy eye” is a neuro-developmental vision condition that begins in early childhood.
  • To see clearly, your visual system relies upon a dynamic interaction between your eyes and your brain. In fact, at least 70% of all sensory cues to the brain are related to vision.
  • Vision and perception problems are more common among children with special needs than the average population. If undiagnosed or untreated, it can affect their behavior, interfering with reading and learning, and reducing their ability to perform routine tasks. Learn how vision therapy can help.
  • Undiagnosed vision problems are at times at the root or an overlooked component of a child’s diagnosis with ADD/ADHD or a learning disability. By undergoing a thorough eye evaluation, you may discover that the issue is, in fact, a functional vision problem. Fortunately, this can be corrected with a highly effective vision therapy program.
  • Approximately 60% of stroke survivors develop some form of visual impairment, including diminished central or peripheral vision, eye movement abnormalities, or visual perceptual defects. Focus, double vision, balance, visual memory, and depth perception are all affected. A neuro-optometrist can help rehabilitate any of these and other resultant visual aberrations.
  • Studies show that children with vision problems are twice as likely to be diagnosed with ADD or ADHD as compared to their peers. Learn how vision therapy can help maximize your child's visual skills to reach their full potential.
  • Strabismus, also known as an “eye turn” or “cross-eye”, is a condition characterized by the improper alignment of the eyes. Vision therapy effectively treats this condition by teaching the brain and eyes to work together to correct the eye misalignment and thus achieve clear and comfortable vision.
  • Those with Down syndrome (DS) can experience a range of visual problems and disorders, and can be at risk of developing vision-robbing ocular diseases, such as glaucoma. Read on to learn more and find out how vision therapy can help.
  • Those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can experience a range of visual problems and disorders, such as lazy eye, strabismus, light sensitivity, and the inability to track moving objects, among others. Read on to learn more and how vision therapy can help.
  • Nystagmus is a complex optical condition that causes involuntary eye movements and blurred vision. Fortunately, vision therapy can help.
  • People with anisometropia experience blurred vision because each of their eyes refracts a different amount of light. Left unaddressed, one eye becomes significantly weaker than the other, potentially leading to permanent vision loss. Vision therapy addresses anisometropia and strengthens the weaker eye.
  • Meniere’s disease, a vestibular problem, can be exacerbated by issues related to the visual system. Vision therapy can help reduce dizziness related to visual dysfunction and offer some relief to patients suffering from Meniere’s disease.
  • When the third cranial nerve is damaged it can affect how your eye functions, leaving your eye unable to control specific actions. Learn about third cranial nerve palsy and how it can be treated.
  • Anomalous retinal correspondence (ARC) is a binocular condition often associated with strabismus (eye turn). Learn about ARC and how it can be treated.